If you’re planning a family trip and wondering how to travel with Norditropin®, it may be helpful to know that with some preparation, you can take it with you, whether you’re going across the state or across the globe.

Before you leave.

Plan the number of doses you need, so you’ll know how many pens to pack. To calculate, just divide the number of milligrams in the pen by your child’s daily dose. For example, if your child’s dose is 1.25 mg, a 10 mg pen would be enough for 8 doses.

Parent tip: Some parents bring the number of doses their child will need. That way, there are no storage concerns on the trip home.

Here’s one example:

“For my son, a new FlexPro® pen is 8 doses. So a week or so before a 5-day trip, we’ll plan to use a new pen for 3 doses, then set that pen aside to take with us. While we’re traveling, we use the remaining 5 doses and dispose of the device on our last day.”

Please follow your doctor's instructions when traveling with your medication.

Refrigeration optional. After first use (up to 77 degrees)

aAll unused Norditropin® products must be refrigerated (36°F to 46°F) prior to first use. Do not freeze and avoid direct light. After first injection, Norditropin® pens can either be stored outside of the refrigerator (up to 77°F) for use within 3 weeks, or in the refrigerator (between 36°F and 46°F) for use within 4 weeks.

Get your FlexPro® pens ready. If you’re taking pens that have been primed, you won’t need to refrigerate them. But if you’re taking new devices, you will need to refrigerate until you use them for the first time. So you might need to plan on using a cooler and some ice packs to keep everything at the proper temperature while traveling to your destination. If you’re staying in a hotel, request a room with a refrigerator if you need to store new pens. And if you’re traveling by car, keep in mind the interior temperature can quickly rise above 77°F.

Parent tip: If you need to freeze ice packs, the room fridge may not do the trick. Just ask to keep the ice packs in the hotel freezer—usually the staff is happy to accommodate!

If you’re flying, prepare for security checkpoints. Plan to pack your child’s Norditropin® in your carry-on luggage. Not only will you have it in case checked luggage is delayed, but you’ll also avoid the cargo area’s extreme temperatures. Primed pens can be kept at room temperature in your carry-on bag; new pens should be kept cool in your cooler. Pens should not be stored directly on the ice packs to avoid freezing. Be sure your ice packs are frozen solid—if they’ve started to melt, they are subject to the same rules as other liquids.

Parent tip: Some parents prime their FlexPro® pens ahead of a trip so they can be transported without refrigeration. It’s still a good idea to be prepared with a cooler in case temperatures rise about 77°F (the maximum storage temperature after initial use).a

aAll Norditropin® products must be refrigerated (36°F to 46°F) prior to first use. Do not freeze and avoid direct light. After first injection, Norditropin® pens can either be stored outside of the refrigerator (up to 77°F) for use within 3 weeks, or in the refrigerator (between 36°F and 46°F) for use within 4 weeks.

Get a signed letter from your child’s doctor. The letter should inform airport personnel and airline staff that your child is being treated with Norditropin® and you’ll need to have it in your carry-on luggage. To help out, we’ve created a letter you can download, print, and take right to your doctor to sign.

At the airport.

Get a visual inspection. Ask airport security to visually inspect your medication, instead of putting it through the X-ray scanner. For more info, check the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) rules and regulations ahead of time.

Parent tip: Along with the doctor’s letter, bring the Norditropin® prescription label. Have the bag with the medication and supplies out and ready for inspection. And always allow for extra time, in case of any inspection-related delays.

Follow these tips and traveling with Norditropin® can be smooth sailing, all the way!

Please note that the situations, experiences, and tips described in this article are not intended as medical advice. They are unique to the families depicted and are not necessarily the typical experiences of families with children who have growth hormone–related disorders or are being treated with Norditropin®. Talk to your health care provider regarding the treatment of growth disorders or any health concerns you have.

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